Reminiscences on Death and Is Life Cycle All Backwards

We are all dying.

The only tragedy of death is not the death itself, but a life not lived or the intimacy never shared. Death is nothing but a part of the cycle: we are born, we live, we love, we fade away, we die. To see this as tragedy is just unnecessary dramatizing laws of nature.
There are many contemplations on death written and I would just like to share some I find most inspiring or enlightening.
Like this one by Steve Jobs, which captures the importance of living:
“Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of other’s opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.”
Or the one by Anaïs Nin describing the very core of living itself:
“You live like this, sheltered, in a delicate world, and you believe you are living. Then you read a book… or you take a trip… and you discover that you are not living, that you are hibernating. The symptoms of hibernating are easily detectable: first, restlessness. The second symptom (when hibernating becomes dangerous and might degenerate into death): absence of pleasure. That is all. It appears like an innocuous illness. Monotony, boredom, death. Millions live like this (or die like this) without knowing it. They work in offices. They drive a car. They picnic with their families. They raise children. And then some shock treatment takes place, a person, a book, a song, and it awakens them and saves them from death. Some never awaken.”
When you live, really live, you are not supposed to dread death; yet what with our loved ones? How we cope with their passing, how we live on, how we accept? Maybe the best insight is the one by Lemony Snicket:
“It is a curious thing, the death of a loved one. We all know that our time in this world is limited, and that eventually all of us will end up underneath some sheet, never to wake up. And yet it is always a surprise when it happens to someone we know. It is like walking up the stairs to your bedroom in the dark, and thinking there is one more stair than there is. Your foot falls down, through the air, and there is a sickly moment of dark surprise as you try and readjust the way you thought of things.” 
Oscar Wilde shares an interesting observation on what death really is, and after contemplating upon it, I have to admit to feel at peace with the very concept of death:
“Death must be so beautiful. To lie in the soft brown earth, with the grasses waving above one’s head, and listen to silence. To have no yesterday, and no tomorrow. To forget time, to forgive life, to be at peace.” 
Sense of humor will get you a long way, so why not conclude this reminisce with George Carlin‘s interesting and witty perspective:
“The most unfair thing about life is the way it ends. I mean, life is tough. It takes up a lot of your time. What do you get at the end of it? A Death! What’s that, a bonus? I think the life cycle is all backwards. You should die first, get it out of the way. Then you live in an old age home. You get kicked out when you’re too young, you get a gold watch, you go to work. You work forty years until you’re young enough to enjoy your retirement. You do drugs, alcohol, you party, you get ready for high school. You go to grade school, you become a kid, you play, you have no responsibilities, you become a little baby, you go back into the womb, you spend your last nine months floating …and you finish off as an orgasm.”
Love Gina Wings